Portrait of Raphael
Portrait of Raphael

Raphael Sanzio da Urbino
Oh, my brother was pretty smart, but he wasn't as cool as me . . . I am ashamed of his presence and I am going to see what went wrong in his life.

I am the older brother of Raphael Sanzio da Urbino. I am always concerned about what he did in his early years - wasting money on art, and locking himself in the room, doing whatever he does. It was the Renaissance and it was times where scholars and artists managed to attain wealth. I obviously strode down the path of a scholar, leading and paving the way for my sibblings to do so as well, but Raphael was . . . different, he preferred artistics to knowledge. That being said, he wasn't as daft as I thought he would be, and became one of the most prominent artists in the Renaissance - only to be rivalled by Michelangelo. I mean, who would have known that he would eventually revolutionise the whole world of art, by bringing forth a new and interesting way of painting.

My brother was noted mainly for his achievements in art. He is especially known for taking part in the Vatican project – the task in which Pope Julius II asked him to fresco (painting straight onto the walls without a canvas) many aspects of the Vatican Palace. In this palace, he frescoed a suite of apartments - now known as the Raphael Rooms - in which it is said to contain his best artworks of The School of Athens, The Parnassus and the Disputa. His painting were "great" but like many others, I did understand or accept his drawing styles, and instead preferred the works of his rival, Michelangelo.

His achievements in architecture and printmaking are much less known – but he has contributed significantly in these areas. He designed the plan for the Chigi Chapel at the request of the Papal Treasurer, Agostino Chigi. Although most famous artists were not interested in reproductive print, he contributed printmaking quite significantly. Among some famous prints include the prints of famous paintings such as Galatea and The Parnassus. I am also proud to say that I have taught in the Chigi Chapel, and I have been impressed by its grand architecture.

The paintings by Raphael are considered as the basis of a great, modern, contemporary Western artwork. The artworks are known for its clarity, cleverness and grandeur. Due to this, Raphael’s power and clarity of his presentation have influenced many artworks today. Also, Raphael’s interest in print-making shows us that the greatest artists do not necessarily follow conventions – their uniqueness in style is what makes them great (like our modern Pop Artists) .

Raphael, after I look back, was actually quite a character, and, yeah, he wasn't as cool as me, but he held his own in art, and for that I am proud. It has been 40 years since his early death, but I can see him everywhere, in the house, still imagining him in his room, everytime I walk into a building which he has designed, and most of all, when I take a quiet stroll in town, and see all of his magnificent masterpieces - his art.

The School of Athens, 1510-1511
The School of Athens, 1510-1511
The Chigi Chapel
The Chigi Chapel

The Parnassus
The Parnassus
Bibliography


Encyclopædia Britannica 2009, Encyclopædia Britannica Online – Raphael Sanzio, viewed 28 Nov. 2009.
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Farlex Inc. 2009, Raphael Sanzio, Hutchinson Encyclopaedia article about Raphael Sanzio, viewed 30 Nov. 2009.
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RaphaelSanzio.org 2009, Raphael – The Complete Works, viewed 30 Nov. 2009.
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http://www.raphaelsanzio.org>

WC Gallery 2008, Biography and Paintings of Raphael Sanzio, viewed 28 Nov. 2009.
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http://www.allartclassic.com/author_biography.php?p_number=110>

Wikipedia 2009, Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopaedia: Raphael de Urbino Sanzio, viewed 29 Nov. 2009.
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raphael>